La Frontierra Chingada

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Media
Event Type
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)
Event Type
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)
Room Size (for public screenings)

$75.00
$75.00
$350.00
$350.00
$295.00
$295.00
$350.00
$350.00
$625.00
$625.00
$75.00 — $625.00

Video

Description

A poetic non-fiction film about motherhood on the US-Mexico border. These figures (mythic and otherwise) manifest themselves at Friendship Park–a space where families on either side of la frontera can come together, but under extreme conditions of surveillance. Guided in part by conversations with the filmmaker’s matrilineal family, the film concerns itself with relationships between bodies, space, and the shared land and history in the San Diego-Tijuana region.

Please Note:
– If you would like to host a screening for a room size larger than what is listed (500 for single screenings, 250 for university) please fill out the form for a price quote.

– We will ship the media to arrive 7 days prior to your screening.

Additional Information

Runtime: 66 min.

Rating: NR

Genres: Documentary, Independent, Cultural Studies, Mexico

Subtitles / Closed Captioning: Some English Subtitles

Festivals and Press Materials

Provincetown Film Society

Press Kit

“[Packer] succeeds in creating a powerful visual essay that, in its eloquence and compassion, works towards building a culture of empathy.”  — Filmmaker Baba Hillman

“[A]n intense and unsettling work that opens viewers up to new structures of feeling. Packer’s images invite the viewer to experience the perplexity of a San Diego woman who connects to the border by looking out the living room window into the far distance across the bay, or to feel the waves of grief and loss of a deported mother desperate but unable to touch her daughters through the iron mesh fence, to sense the anxiety of a mother waiting for a son who disappeared. “ — Artist and Activist Jill Holslin

“[The film] gives you the sense that there is something you ought to know that you don’t know, if you don’t have Spanglish. That experience of getting lost is important.” — Associate Professor of Law and Ethnic Flavio Risech-Ozeguera